Monochrome Monday… Reflection, Lower Largo

Reflection, Lower Largo, October 2018Reflection, Lower Largo, October 2018
Nikon F3HP, Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AI-S – 1/250s, f11, – Agfa APX 400 rated at ISO 320

I can’t wait to get back to the coast… any bit of coast will do but my favourite is that around Fife in Scotland. A stroll on the beach at Lower Largo followed by a pie and a pint in the Railway Inn would hit the spot today.

Scan by AgLab with minimal cropping and tweaking in Lightroom Classic CC.

Single frame… In Memory of Joseph L. Anderson

In Memory of Joseph L. AndersonIn Memory of Joseph L. Anderson
Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon XF 18-135mm f3.5~5.6 R LM OIS WR at 46mm, 1/210s, f8, ISO 400

Joseph Low Anderson (20), a bachelor and compositor by trade, who was born in Auchtermuchty in Fife, had the misfortune to board a Dundee-bound train at Cupar on Sunday 28 December 1879 and became one of the 59 confirmed victims of the Tay Bridge disaster.

His body was found near Caithness on 23 April 1879 and was apparently only identifiable by his watch.

I can’t resist the urge to include William Topaz McGonagall’s poem about the disaster…

The Tay Bridge Disaster

Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay!
Alas! I am very sorry to say
That ninety lives have been taken away
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

’Twas about seven o’clock at night,
And the wind it blew with all its might,
And the rain came pouring down,
And the dark clouds seem’d to frown,
And the Demon of the air seem’d to say-
“I’ll blow down the Bridge of Tay.”

When the train left Edinburgh
The passengers’ hearts were light and felt no sorrow,
But Boreas blew a terrific gale,
Which made their hearts for to quail,
And many of the passengers with fear did say-
“I hope God will send us safe across the Bridge of Tay.”

But when the train came near to Wormit Bay,
Boreas he did loud and angry bray,
And shook the central girders of the Bridge of Tay
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

So the train sped on with all its might,
And Bonnie Dundee soon hove in sight,
And the passengers’ hearts felt light,
Thinking they would enjoy themselves on the New Year,
With their friends at home they lov’d most dear,
And wish them all a happy New Year.

So the train mov’d slowly along the Bridge of Tay,
Until it was about midway,
Then the central girders with a crash gave way,
And down went the train and passengers into the Tay!
The Storm Fiend did loudly bray,
Because ninety lives had been taken away,
On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

As soon as the catastrophe came to be known
The alarm from mouth to mouth was blown,
And the cry rang out all o’er the town,
Good Heavens! the Tay Bridge is blown down,
And a passenger train from Edinburgh,
Which fill’d all the peoples hearts with sorrow,
And made them for to turn pale,
Because none of the passengers were sav’d to tell the tale
How the disaster happen’d on the last Sabbath day of 1879,
Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

It must have been an awful sight,
To witness in the dusky moonlight,
While the Storm Fiend did laugh, and angry did bray,
Along the Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
I must now conclude my lay
By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,
That your central girders would not have given way,
At least many sensible men do say,
Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,
At least many sensible men confesses,
For the stronger we our houses do build,
The less chance we have of being killed.

Square Saturday… Crail, October 2018

Crail, October 2018Crail, October 2018
Seagull 4A – 1/300s, f11 – Ilford HP5 Plus rated at ISO 320

Another shot from my charity shop find Seagull 4A twin-lens reflex camera.

Crail is a delightful harbour town on the Fife coast, famous for its fresh shellfish and its annual food festival.

It was very chilly and rather breezy the day I was there, with only a handful of (well wrapped up) tourists braving the elements…

Scan by AgLab with minimal cropping and tweaking in Lightroom Classic CC.

Monochrome Monday… The Forth Bridge

The Forth Bridge, October 2018The Forth Bridge, October 2018
Nikon F3HP, Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 AI-S – 1/125s, f16, – Agfa APX 400 rated at ISO 320

The iconic Forth Bridge photographed from North Queensferry a few weeks ago. The rail wheels on the shore provide interesting (if somewhat worrying) foreground interest.

On this particular day I photographed the bridge from both North and South Queensferry and I really do think that I could photograph it month in and month out and never become bored with it…

Scan by AgLab with minimal cropping and tweaking in Lightroom Classic CC.

Single frame… Culross Pier

Culross PierCulross Pier
Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon XF 18-135mm f3.5~5.6 R LM OIS WR at 31mm, 1/90s, f16, ISO 400

Culross has one of the oldest harbours in Scotland and was a busy port in the 16th and 17th centuries trading coal and salt with the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and Denmark.

Since the 1930s the National Trust for Scotland have been working on preserving and restoring its many unique historical buildings.

The pier was neglected for many years but thanks to the efforts of determined locals its restoration is now complete.

The Hopper Dredger UKD Orca can also be seen in the distance.

Square Saturday… Fife Ness, October 2018

Fife Ness, October 2018Fife Ness, October 2018
Seagull 4A – 1/300s, f8 – Ilford HP5 Plus rated at ISO 320

I received five rolls of film back from the lab today, this image is from a roll of Ilford HP5 Plus shot in a charity shop find Seagull 4A twin-lens reflex camera.

Fife Ness is a headland that forms the most easterly point in Fife, Scotland and consists mainly of a windswept golf course and a light house.

The circular marks in the rocks in the foreground are the remains of a template for a lighthouse that was started in 1813 by the engineer Robert Stevenson. The cut stones for the tower were checked against these marks to ensure they would fit perfectly before being shipped out to the offshore North Carr Reef. Construction ended in 1818 when the almost complete lighthouse was destroyed in a winter storm.

Scan by AgLab with minimal cropping and tweaking in Lightroom Classic CC.